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Disaster Recovery

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The Disaster Recovery Planning :: View topic - So, why business continuity planning?
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So, why business continuity planning?

 
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SamHannaBCP
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 27, 2005 5:31 am    Post subject: So, why business continuity planning? Reply with quote

So, why business continuity planning?

With all the major undertakings within a healthcare organization, Business Continuity Planning needs to show the benefits early on in the process to keep executives engaged and seeing the value of the work. It is essential to gain the backing and sponsorship of senior or executive management. By far the best way to achieve this, rather than through highlighting the negative, is to illustrate the positive gains of having an effective Business Continuity Management process in place.

So, why business continuity planning?

Protection of shareholder value. For one reason, in a healthcare environment you are dealing with patients, healthcare workers, vendors and other constituents who all have direct relationships with your organization. They are your shareholders and you need to protect them.

Reducing risks by performing a risk assessment. This is extremely important since you don't know where you are going to go if you don't know where you are now. Knowing what the obstacles and deficiencies are will enable you to resolve issues and come up with viable solutions. Improved understanding of the business is gained through risk analysis

You can reduce downtime when alternative processes and workarounds are identified. Once you conduct your risk assessment, you will know what your processes and business and system functions are. Once you know all that, you will be able to come up with different ways to deal with downtime without jeopardizing the mission of what you are doing.

Compliance issues can be monitored and dealt with once you know what your processes are. This is becoming a more pertinent issue with HIPAA and JCAHO surveys. From my experience and as I look into the crystal ball, I see these regulatory and compliance issues becoming the driver and catalyst for the work regarding BCP.

Vital records. You can protect and maintain vital records if you have a business continuity plan since you will know what you need and where and how often you need it. This will in turn decrease your down time and maintain your business while you deal with a disaster or event.

Health & Safety. This is very important in a hospital or any healthcare setting as you are protecting patients, employees, the community and everyone that is connected to you. This lines up with the first point above.

Operational Effectiveness. Through knowing what your systems and processes are, you are able to develop better standard and reengineer your organization and function to run optimally.

Avoidance of liability. The more preparation you do, the less you have to worry about events unfolding. Off course we all worry about unexpected events, but being prepared enables you to face them and know how to deal with them while at the same time, limiting the liability of having not done anything at all.

Business continuity is all about value. The more value driven your plans are, the easier it is to sell to Executive Management. You need to ensure that your healthcare setting is fully aware of the benefits and the risks involved in not doing this.

Sam Hanna, MBA, CISA Directs the Business Continuity Planning Initiative at a Healthcare Institution. He can be reached at samhanna44@yahoo.com
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PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2005 1:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

ok

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PostPosted: Sat May 28, 2005 3:00 am    Post subject: Re: So, why business continuity planning? Reply with quote

Great piece. I checked out your blog and it is very informative. You should write some more.

Tom


SamHannaBCP wrote:
So, why business continuity planning?

With all the major undertakings within a healthcare organization, Business Continuity Planning needs to show the benefits early on in the process to keep executives engaged and seeing the value of the work. It is essential to gain the backing and sponsorship of senior or executive management. By far the best way to achieve this, rather than through highlighting the negative, is to illustrate the positive gains of having an effective Business Continuity Management process in place.

So, why business continuity planning?

Protection of shareholder value. For one reason, in a healthcare environment you are dealing with patients, healthcare workers, vendors and other constituents who all have direct relationships with your organization. They are your shareholders and you need to protect them.

Reducing risks by performing a risk assessment. This is extremely important since you don't know where you are going to go if you don't know where you are now. Knowing what the obstacles and deficiencies are will enable you to resolve issues and come up with viable solutions. Improved understanding of the business is gained through risk analysis

You can reduce downtime when alternative processes and workarounds are identified. Once you conduct your risk assessment, you will know what your processes and business and system functions are. Once you know all that, you will be able to come up with different ways to deal with downtime without jeopardizing the mission of what you are doing.

Compliance issues can be monitored and dealt with once you know what your processes are. This is becoming a more pertinent issue with HIPAA and JCAHO surveys. From my experience and as I look into the crystal ball, I see these regulatory and compliance issues becoming the driver and catalyst for the work regarding BCP.

Vital records. You can protect and maintain vital records if you have a business continuity plan since you will know what you need and where and how often you need it. This will in turn decrease your down time and maintain your business while you deal with a disaster or event.

Health & Safety. This is very important in a hospital or any healthcare setting as you are protecting patients, employees, the community and everyone that is connected to you. This lines up with the first point above.

Operational Effectiveness. Through knowing what your systems and processes are, you are able to develop better standard and reengineer your organization and function to run optimally.

Avoidance of liability. The more preparation you do, the less you have to worry about events unfolding. Off course we all worry about unexpected events, but being prepared enables you to face them and know how to deal with them while at the same time, limiting the liability of having not done anything at all.

Business continuity is all about value. The more value driven your plans are, the easier it is to sell to Executive Management. You need to ensure that your healthcare setting is fully aware of the benefits and the risks involved in not doing this.

Sam Hanna, MBA, CISA Directs the Business Continuity Planning Initiative at a Healthcare Institution. He can be reached at samhanna44@yahoo.com
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PostPosted: Sat Jun 25, 2005 12:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good article Sam. I am in healthcare and will take this info to heart.

Bob
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